Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Puritan Virtues and Millennial Entitlement

This question hits right at the passive aggressive Cold War that seems to be the pivotal point of conflict between millennials and the elder superiors, and the very reason the term “millennial” is intoned by many of the latter with a flourish of grand distaste.  Millennials want too much from their jobs, and are entitled to the point of having a deleterious effect on the workplaces they inhabit.

I have to confess, when I was first invited for my writing to be featured in this millennial bloggers series in Huffington Post, I was concerned about branding myself with a near synonym for this haze of entitlement.  But as a matter of numbers, even though I’m towards the beginning of this birth era, most definitions of the term would label me one.  So here I am.

The most trumpeted origin of this entitlement is the self-esteem movement in education.  My headmaster delivered a fiery denunciation of said movement, and his vision was certainly reflected in the school environment.  Over 350 years after the Puritans had founded this New England school, the upholders of their hard-won virtue did not flinch –they let us know that any ounce of exaltation would come only after a full pound of debasement through labor, whether on the sports field, in the classroom, or elsewhere.

The disadvantage of this approach was a claustrophobic adolescence.  The advantage was that anyone gazing back on it from adulthood inevitably said everything afterwards was comparatively easy.  

The greatest sense of meaning and fulfillment usually only comes when an achievement is genuinely substantive and valuable to others – in a way that not too many other laborers are offering.  Yes, a sense of daily joy and interpersonal engagement can facilitate the heavy lifting, and many products that are valuable in society may not feel deeply meaningful to produce.   But some combination of talent, refinement, and hard work is fairly indispensable to the ability to achieve in the first place.

I’d like to move some boulders in my career – and not the Sisyphean type.  But I’d prefer to do it around people with a sense of humor, and the spark of wit that connects a process and a product to the human experience on the other end.  The sum total of all the above is, alas, hard to find.